How Many Vampires Fit in an Elevator?

Funny how we writers think. Sometimes we’re overly concerned about whether it’s clear that our character took the car keys with him or buttoned her coat, and other times we feel it’s vital to make our fiction as solid as indisputable scientific fact.  Believable fiction is always the best, but there are times I think maybe we go too far.

When I’m not writing Urban Fantasy, I’m an author success coach, a book reviewer and an acquisition editor for a small publisher. Trust me, I see it all, from the car keys obsession mentioned earlier, to the mammoth scientific explanations as to why a werewolf changes during the full moon. Sometimes it’s entertaining, other times it gets a little boring, but every time I see this kind of thing I understand with my whole heart. It’s the process.

Take my Twice-Baked Vampire Series. I knew I was crossing a bazillion lines with the concept of a double-dead vampire getting a chance to earn his way into heaven. The words Redemption and Vampire are never mentioned in the same sentence and getting this concept into the realm of the believable took a lot … of editing. I, like just about every other fantasy and urban fantasy author in the planet. felt that I not only had to tell my readers how many vampires fit in an elevator … I had to convince them.

Back up and punt is a way of life when the editing part of a writers journey comes along and my best editors are the first round of vital eyes … my friends. Nope, they’re not writers or certified, diploma toting editors … they’re average readers with average readers’ eyes and thought processes. They are the prototype for the book buyers down the road. I honestly think that no qualified line editor could be as brutal as a friend (the one you spent detention with years ago) writing a note on your manuscript that says “all right already! I get it!” These readers are priceless because they help me take the temperature of the market. Real editors? Of course I and my publishers use them too, but by the time they see the book, I’ve created a world and reality that is palatable, enjoyable and hopefully pretty darn believable.

Personally, I like the supernatural details in the everyday life events. That cookie recipe your Aunt Mary has, how come they always taste slightly different, made you feel slightly giddier, looked slightly more inviting than when anyone else in the world makes them? Is it because Aunt Mary is so sweet and special and loving? Or, is it because Aunt Mary is part Fae and uses an ingredient that comes trough her fingertips and makes those cookies irresistible!  And that kid playing Little League Baseball at the park across the street. Is he really that extraordinary? Does he really have a stronger, more accurate arm than any other ten year old in the world? Does he carry himself like Chipper Jones because he loves the Atlanta Braves? Or is that little boy actually a pure bread werewolf destined to be in the Cooperstown Baseball Hall of Fame along with a few of his own kind we never knew about? My mind is always roiling with these possibilities. Are those colorful auras in the room really ghosts who came uninvited to my party? Maybe I’m just tired? Maybe they are ghosts. The dishwashers working in a professional kitchen are all seal shape-shifters. The bank teller was once a statue overseeing a mummified Egyptian king’s fortune. The elderly crossing guard at the corner of Westfield and Bower Hill is really Merlin. My sister is really … well, you get the point. When ideas twist and swirl like Dorothy’s Kansas tornado, any writer feels the responsibility to defend and explain their concepts.

But in the end it isn’t about how many vampires I think fit in an elevator or how many trolls I think it takes to change a light bulb. It’s not even about whether I think my Aunt Mary is part Fae … it’s all about what I can make you believe.

Now, believe it or not, something just tapped me on the shoulder and whispered “GET BACK TO WORK”. I’m not even going to try to explain that one.

Vampire Explored is a blog by Deborah Riley-Magnus, author of The Twice Baked Vampire Series. Book 1, Cold in California

COLD IN CALIFORNIA

Ah, Those Wonderful Vampiric Characters that Bite!

Today I thought I’d explore Vampiric Characters … those fabulous supernatural characters who bite into your imagination. They could be vampires, werewolves, members of the Fae, leprechauns, ghosts or even ancient legends that you simply can’t ignore. As lovers of Fantasy, Paranormal Romance, Urban Fantasy or anything about the supernatural world, we all get hooked. We pick up a book and instantly fall in love with Louie from Interview with a Vampire, the beautiful story of The Lovely Bones, or Sookie Stackhouse and her amazing relationships with vampires Bill and Eric, werewolf Alcide and shape-shifter Sam. As readers we buy into it all, no matter how crazy or far fetched it sounds to our logical, real life minds.

But as writers, something more happens. As writers we become sponges, sifting through the concepts and squeezing out something unique to our own mind’s eye. As writers we strive to push the envelope and create something utterly different and exciting.

As I see it, there are three ways to break through the wall of standard fantasy and push through to create those characters that hook in and refuse to let a reader go.

LOOK AT IT DIFFERENTLY– If most of the urban fantasy we read takes place in New York City, imagine how that story would unfold in Omaha, or Amsterdam or Miami. The colors of the story change and we discover that the location becomes a character of its own. What fun to imagine an adventure taking place in the desert instead of on a mountain top, or in a 1970’s commune instead of a contemporary big city. The same characters we create in our mind act and react differently in a completely different environment. Oh, what fun!

BREAK THE RULES – Just because a concept regarding supernatural characters is generally accepted does NOT mean we have to follow it. Who says vampire always have to feed off humans, what if they would rather feed off your pets? Who says leprechauns have to be short or hiding the pot of gold? Maybe they’re really very tall and are painfully allergic to gold. Who says angels have wings? The devil has horns? The werewolf must shift and kill? It’s all fiction and way more fun to create a fiction no one else ever thought about!

PUMP UP THE CHARACTERS– Vampires have certain abilities, but what if we give them more, or take away the abilities their associates have? Tearing away the stereotypical traits we’ve come to accept can give us writers room to blast a whole new reality for our characters. What if a vampire was made from a Nephalim? What if a shape shifter could only shift into inanimate objects? What if a fairy could only survive as a plant during the daylight hours and a giant in the dark? What if? What if? What if?

Authors have been asking “what if” and stretching our imaginations this way for a long time! Biting into us with unique characters, twisted mixes of human personalities, supernatural qualities and amazing entertainment! What if? The only “what if” I’m glad we don’t have to deal with, as readers or writers, is “What if the imagination stopped flowing?” because THAT would definitely be a dark fantasy of epic proportions! Viva la Creativity!

What vampiric characters have bitten into you lately?

 Vampire Explored is a blog by Deborah Riley-Magnus, author of the Twice-Baked Vampire Series! Book 1, Cold in California

Cold in California cover, smCOLD IN CALIFORNIA

Urban Fantasy – The Character of Environment

Readers and writers know all about characters – that they require fleshing out and development, names and backgrounds, personalities, strengths and weaknesses. Readers become attached to the mental image of what that character must look like and how his or her voice might sounds. But there’s more to it than that. More than the description of hair color or warts, more than the story … more than the era or genre.

 

There’s the environment. And I’m not talking about a little rain or maybe a vague description of a fictitious city here, I’m talking ENVIRONMENT on steroids!

 

Take Twilight. All that thick cloudy gloom of the Pacific Northwest combines to create a total package for Bella and her experiences. It does more than serve as a literary tool to permit vampires not to sparkle so much as to be recognized, it sets the mood. Now skip over to Charlain Harris’s Dead Until Dark (True Blood). The environment in this series is painted by poor and lower middle class Northern Louisiana. The prolific environment there is the sordid haze of southern prejudice and bigotry.

Environment tells more of the story than plot or characters! Ask any reader about a story they loved and the answer will include everything from location to weather and cultural influence, perhaps before even one character is mentioned. It’s the careful setting of the stage that makes the difference.

 

In my book, Cold in California, I was determined to make the environment a character in and of itself. Yes, California is the clothing this character wears, but the true environment is the warehouse where 60 or so dead and double-dead supernatural creatures live together. There, secretly hidden in West Hollywood, they try to find ways to behave themselves so they can take advantage of their one last chance to earn heaven. It’s about redemption in a city knee deep in anything but redemption. The warehouse needed to be a canvas for these creatures. It’s not exactly “the island of misfit toys’, it’s more like the Murphy’s Law pathway to the Pearly Gates. This environment needed to do two distinct things. First, the warehouse had to create a safe environment for dead supernaturals to be themselves, and second, it had to be real-world recognized for what it is, a holding tank for the world’s incorrigibles.

 

The space wanted to feel scrapped together with furniture left on the street for trash pick-up. It needed a system that reminded readers of the unemployment or social security office. And it had to serve every kind of race that might end up there, even Stick Man who is 12 feet tall, so he has a double-wide room where he sleeps on two beds head to head. The warehouse is bricked with history no one knows or wants to know. It has secret areas where the head honcho – like Crudo, the troll in charge – can find a few hours of peace and quiet when he wants. This warehouse makes love to it’s inmates by providing everything each one needs, high walls for one character’s vast collection of murder mystery books, dark corners for the double-dead vampires to lurk and meet and squabble within. Private places for pixie/leprechaun (uh-hem) interaction and a door that closes so that loner and soon-to-be hero, twice-baked vampire Gabriel Strickland, can sulk and bemoan his situation, at least in the beginning.

 

The warehouse keeps secrets and exposes treachery. It provides safety and yet is extremely vulnerable. It breathes with a life of its own. And it does all that without one line of dialogue or one action. Now, how’s that for a stellar character?

 

What book environments have impressed you most as you read or wrote them?

 

Vampire Explored is a blog by Deborah Riley-Magnus, author of the Twice-Baked Vampire Series! Cold in California

Cold in California cover, lgCOLD IN CALIFORNIA

 

One Werewolf’s Conscience

What’s a werewolf? I mean, in most imaginations it’s that scary creature that – without any choice of its own – changes into a deadly animal during the full moon and tries to eat people roaming through the woods. Well, okay, not everyone has woods, or forests, or even a nice large park close by, but as paranormal and supernatural adventures continue to fascinate readers, werewolves are sure to show up just about anywhere …

  • In a pretty woman’s bedroom
  • In the animal rescue league kennels
  • At a back yard cookout
  • A ballgame
  • In the dirty city alleys
  • In a warehouse

Yes, a warehouse. In this case, no, it isn’t a warehouse shipping werewolves like an import/export business. This warehouse is purgatory for dead werewolves chosen for a second chance to earn a ticket through the Pearly Gates. In Book 1 of the Twice Baked Vampire Series, Cold in California, lots of dead, and in the case of vampires, double-dead supernaturals get this cool second chance to prove themselves worthy. This particular warehouse, located in West Hollywood, might be a really sweet, happy kind of place – if every character living there gave a good goddamn about getting to heaven.

Here are the facts: Survival is what matters most to these creatures. After all, survival was the focus of their lives, so why not their purgatory? Second, these are political animals, more so than humans by a long shot. The Gnomes are ambitious, demanding and extremely creative creatures. The Shape-Shifters are metro-sexual, mainly to fit into the Hollywood environment. Well hell, Shape-Shifters were always responsible for blending in, right? The Twice-Baked Vampires are volatile, no surprise there. The Fae are the resident elite while the Leprechauns are belligerent in their efforts to pay homage to no one around them. The trolls are efficient and effective managers. The Pixies, well, the Pixies are kind of like the sex symbols of the warehouse, hot, steamy, lustful and satisfying … if you can catch one that is.

The only dead supernatural creatures facing and dealing with the stark reality of the warehouse purgatory are the werewolves, and in the West Hollywood warehouse, there is only one werewolf, Pete Maloney.

Some (specifically Twice-Baked Vampire, Gabriel Strickland) call him “The Reverend”. Pete sees the whole picture, which is why he has always stood at the side of the warehouse manager to help keep peace and organization among the inmates. They’re all there to earn heaven, but they’re all pretty flawed souls who’ve spent a lifetime or two ignoring the golden rule. Pete likes the golden rule, and he generally likes his position as helper and second fiddle. He gets to watch souls come and go, see where they’re most likely heading (up or down) when final judgment arrives for them, and this is one werewolf wise enough to steer clear of controversy. He’s not a politician, he’s a brilliant trouble shooter. He’s not interested in power, he’s fascinated with the effects of the unscrupulous desires of others. “The Reverend” can laugh, enjoy some play time with a Pixie, stand at the leader’s side during a battle or storm, and still read a good mystery alone in his room. Pete Malone is an enigma among the population of the West Hollywood warehouse!

Vampire Explored is a blog by Deborah Riley-Magnus, author of the Twice-Baked Vampire Series, Cold in California

Cold in California cover, lgCOLD IN CALIFORNIA

What’s in a Title?

 

I went strolling through the bookstore for inspiration the other day. What struck me … even more then the vibrant covers … were the names of the books, specifically, the KEY WORDS found in so many Urban Fantasy, and Paranormal Romance book titles.

For example …

KEY TITLE WORDS IN URBAN FANTASY BOOKS

  • Hunter
  • Huntress
  • Guardian
  • Angels (fallen, of course)
  • Faerie
  • Demon
  • Blood (blood and more blood)
  • Dark
  • Light
  • Night
  • Moon
  • Wicked

 

KEY TITLE WORDS IN VAMPIRE BOOKS

  • Secret
  • Kiss
  • Thirst
  • Blood (of course)
  • Werewolf (odd)
  • Moon
  • Beginning
  • Hell
  • Desire
  • Devil Fire

Now I walked over to the Young Adult Fantasy department and this got pretty interesting. No wonder why teenagers are so scary!

KEY TITLE WORDS IN YA FANTASY BOOKS

  • Demons
  • Shadows
  • Darkness
  • Blood
  • Witch
  • Dragon
  • Night
  • Fallen
  • Powerless
  • Evil
  • Moon (Red, Black, Dark and a few other frightening versions)
  • Guilt
  • Dead
  • Dread
  • Fire
  • Godless

Sheesh! Do you think maybe it’s our fault the Young Adults are so damn angsty?

Vampire Explored is a blog by Deborah Riley-Magnus, author the Twice-Baked Vampire Series. Book 1, Cold in California

Cold in California cover, lgCOLD IN CALIFORNIA

What’s a Self-Respecting Pixie to do?

Pixies. These are supposed to be mythical creatures of ancient folklore. Are they from Cornwall? Britain? Sweden? Some tell me they have Germanic or Scandinavian origin. Who knows? Are they related to the Fae? Or the tiny demon Tommynackers or Scottish Brownies? Are they related to the Leprechaun? Are they part Sprite? Or maybe they are just memories of the aboriginal spirits at the building of Stonehenge?

I’ve heard stories that Pixies love pretty things and like to steal your jewelry or hair combs, but I always thought that was just something to take the suspicion off my younger sister. My grandmother, a fine woman of Polish descent, used to tell me there was a Pixie in the house if things fell off the counter. Never mind that I didn’t put it securely on the counter, it wasn’t my fault, it was the Pixie’s. In fact, even if I did do something wrong, she always blamed the Pixies. Pixies loved to create mischief and I really loved my grandmother!

Enter … FICTION. This is what I love most about fiction because in truth, fiction writers care less about what history tells us and more about what our grandmothers said.

Between what my grandmother told me and my imagination, I see Pixies as mischievous sexual dynamos. Creatures that are so damn pretty and attractive they can get away with anything, even murder. Think Hollywood, think furs and diamonds and Elizabeth Taylor. Think Marilyn Monroe! These are gorgeous creatures that cause havoc just by walking by. When I write a Pixie into a story, he or she is oozing misbehavior. The word Tomfoolery comes from a famous Swedish Pixie named Tom Fool who was so sexy, hundreds of women in one village alone left their husbands just to get a few moments alone with him. Seriously. Well, not really, but my fictitious Pixies are that kind of powerful.

They like to cause trouble, but they also have a job to do, just like everything else in the universe. See in my books, Pixie have, throughout all time, been the creatures you want to seek out to help find lost things or people. Misplaced your queen? Find a Pixie, and if s/he isn’t currently entangled in some amorous activity, your queen will be found and returned to you … minus a few jewels, of course. Not only does a Pixie deserve payment, they also love to snarf sparkly things.  And don’t even think about accusing them of theft. You never want to come face to face with a pissed off Pixie!

Well, those are my Pixie thoughts. What are yours? Have you read something that supports or contradicts my ideas? If so, I’d LOVE to hear them!

Vampire Explored is a blog by Deborah Riley-Magnus, author of the Twice-Baked Vampire Series. Book 1, Cold in California

Cold in California cover, lg

COLD IN CALIFORNIA

 

Next Age, New Wave, Sparkle Mange, Twice Baked, it’s still Vampire to me!

What’s the first supernatural book you ever read? Where the Wild Things Are? Interview with a Vampire? Twilight? Dead Until Dark? Dracula? Whether the book was written by Anne Rice, Charlaine Harris, or Bram Stoker, it caught our fancy and twisted our imagination into scary, curious and challenging ideas.

The mythology of every supernatural character slips and slides from ancient fears and superstitions to current, real life roll-play games or social behavior liken to vampires, werewolves, the fae and any other supernatural creature you can think of. Today, I want to explore mythology and how it still plays a big part in our lives, whether we’re simply looking for reading or viewing entertainment, or trying to live our day to day lives.

Who willingly walks under a ladder or doesn’t change their direction when a black cat crosses their path? Who doesn’t have a lucky sock, charm, piece of rock, rabbit foot or ( insert item here )? How many times a day do we question Fate or blame her for something that happened or didn’t happen? Whether we want to admit it or not, mythology and superstition are laced through just about every element of our lives. We may not call it superstition. If you’re like me, you blame it on your OCD, because see, if I don’t do it exactly this way every single time, something bad will happen! I’ll forget something else or mix something up wrong! It’s all connected!  I can’t change ANYTHING. OCD or Superstition? Did I create a reason to be superstitious because of my OCD, or did my OCD develop out of some ridiculous superstition?

The way we relate to the supernatural and paranormal world is the same Catch 22. Guess what? There really is a supernatural and paranormal world and it really is just on the other side of the veil. You’ve seen Ghost Hunters.  You hear all the time about hauntings in the neighborhood and even though you might not be as sensitive to these events as another person, you still have to admit, it’s happening. (If you don’t, you’re in denial and probably not someone who follows Vampire Explored, LOL.)

The rules are pretty simple, at least in our human heads. A ghost either a) doesn’t know he’s dead, b) doesn’t like being dead or c) is the ghost of an evil person who sticks around and haunts us. I get that. Lots of times I’m someplace I don’t want to be too and often I act out. Can’t give a ghost a time out though, so we hire and take the advice of ghost hunters, mediums, psychics and self-proclaimed experts in the paranormal field. Or not. Some of us just shrug and move on to the next thing.

Now, let’s talk supernatural. Sometimes the ghost hunting evolves into demon or spirit hunting and that’s where the supernatural come out to play. See, some of those scary mythological creatures look a lot like the paranormal experiences no one can explain away – a really mean entity who can create a nasty smell becomes a “demon”. Strange lights that terrify corralled horses in Montana become Native American “angry spirits”. All kinds of ideas come to us on how to appease and send these entities away so they’ll bother someone else on some other astral plane, but in truth lots of those solutions are right out of our fertile imagination.

These are my theories, developed from a long string of personal experiences and creative ideas. The supernatural world just is. Leave it alone and it’ll leave you alone. You make friends, expect them to stick around a LONG time, after all, all they have is time, right? Take your deepest imaginings about the paranormal, the supernatural, the vampire, shape-shifter and fae world and write them all down. Follow and/or boldly change other writer’s ideas. Watch the mythology splinter and shatter and regroup into all new concepts for our imagination.

That’s what this blog is all about! Peeking into the Fictitious World of Supernaturals. Werewolves can be your next door neighbors. Vampires can sparkle or fly or make mistakes or gain true love … or not.  Faeries can be beautiful or hideous or crafty or just plain flighty. We imagine these creatures as we wish them to be, they grew from some myth or legend, they develop for each generation and oh, one thing I will tell you … I LOVE that this generation has a little fun with it all. I mean … seriously … even the meanest vampire has gotta have a sense of humor.

At least that’s what I imagine! You have any thoughts on all this? Comment away, I’d love to hear your ideas!


Vampire Explored is a blog by Deborah Riley-Magnus, author of the Twice-Baked Vampire Series. Book 1, Cold in California  !

Cold in California cover, lgCOLD IN CALIFORNIA